Healthy Communities

The dream of Ujima Enterprises is to have students who are centered in their own historical experiences. Such students, given the objectives of the Ujima project, will be capable of creating healthy communities by transforming themselves into viable citizens. Nothing is so correct for these students as the attachment to cultural truths that produce in the children the kind of values that are necessary for advancement.

Dr. Molefi Kete Asante

40 Acres and a Mule Promise to Slaves: The Real Story

Tunis Campbell

We have been taught in school that the source of the policy of “40 acres and a mule” was Union General William T. Shermans Special Field Order No. 15, issued on Jan. 16, 1865. That account is half-right: Sherman prescribed the 40 acres in that Order, but not the mule. The mule would come later. But what many accounts leave out is that this idea for massive land redistribution actually was the result of a discussion that Sherman and Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton held four days before Sherman issued the Order, with 20 leaders of the black community in Savannah, Ga., where Sherman was headquartered following his famous March to the Sea. The meeting was unprecedented in American history.

Today, we commonly use the phrase “40 acres and a mule,” but few of us have read the Order itself. Three of its parts are relevant here. Section one bears repeating in full: “The islands from Charleston, south, the abandoned rice fields along the rivers for thirty miles back from the sea, and the country bordering the St. Johns river, Florida, are reserved and set apart for the settlement of the negroes [sic] now made free by the acts of war and the proclamation of the President of the United States.”

Section two specifies that these new communities, moreover, would be governed entirely by black people themselves: ” … on the islands, and in the settlements hereafter to be established, no white person whatever, unless military officers and soldiers detailed for duty, will be permitted to reside; and the sole and exclusive management of affairs will be left to the freed people themselves … By the laws of war, and orders of the President of the United States, the negro [sic] is free and must be dealt with as such.”

MORE:  40 Acres and a Mule Promise to Slaves: The Real Story.

 

 


 


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